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kohenari:

It turns out that the fancy booze you like is actually not so fancy after all. Most of the “craft,” “handmade,” “artisan” whisky that people have been hyping all comes from the same gigantic distillery in Indiana.
A lot of my friends here in Nebraska will be particularly saddened to learn the following about their beloved, local-ish brand:

Templeton Rye … has built its successful brand on being a product of Templeton, Iowa. They tell an elaborate story about how their recipe was used by the owner’s family to make illicit whiskey in Iowa during Prohibition, and how that rye had become Al Capone’s favorite hooch. They publish a description of their “Production Process” so detailed it lists the temperature (124 degrees) at which the “rye grain is added to the mash tank.” They brag that they focus their “complete attention on executing each step of the distillation process.” And yet, for all this detail, the official “Production Process” somehow fails to mention that Templeton doesn’t actually do the distilling.
Dig around enough on the Templeton Rye website, and you’ll find acknowledgment that their whiskey is factory-made in Indiana. But clinging to the craft distiller fiction, Templeton does its best to maintain that, rather than taking MGP whiskey off the shelf, they are somehow instructing the manufacturer how to make the juice.

I don’t much care for rye. I’m a wheated bourbon guy through-and-through. But apparently I really don’t like mass-produced rye. It’s interesting to now learn that my lack of interest in Dickel, Bulleit, and even the much ballyhooed Templeton stems from the fact that they’re all basically the same product in different bottles. If I don’t like mass-produced rye, I’m not going to like it no matter how it’s packaged.
That said, the amount of nonsense that Templeton is tossing out there to convince people that they’re making their own hooch really leaves a bad taste in my mouth far beyond the ordinary bad taste of the rye.
HT: Kris Kanthak.

kohenari:

It turns out that the fancy booze you like is actually not so fancy after all. Most of the “craft,” “handmade,” “artisan” whisky that people have been hyping all comes from the same gigantic distillery in Indiana.

A lot of my friends here in Nebraska will be particularly saddened to learn the following about their beloved, local-ish brand:

Templeton Rye … has built its successful brand on being a product of Templeton, Iowa. They tell an elaborate story about how their recipe was used by the owner’s family to make illicit whiskey in Iowa during Prohibition, and how that rye had become Al Capone’s favorite hooch. They publish a description of their “Production Process” so detailed it lists the temperature (124 degrees) at which the “rye grain is added to the mash tank.” They brag that they focus their “complete attention on executing each step of the distillation process.” And yet, for all this detail, the official “Production Process” somehow fails to mention that Templeton doesn’t actually do the distilling.

Dig around enough on the Templeton Rye website, and you’ll find acknowledgment that their whiskey is factory-made in Indiana. But clinging to the craft distiller fiction, Templeton does its best to maintain that, rather than taking MGP whiskey off the shelf, they are somehow instructing the manufacturer how to make the juice.

I don’t much care for rye. I’m a wheated bourbon guy through-and-through. But apparently I really don’t like mass-produced rye. It’s interesting to now learn that my lack of interest in Dickel, Bulleit, and even the much ballyhooed Templeton stems from the fact that they’re all basically the same product in different bottles. If I don’t like mass-produced rye, I’m not going to like it no matter how it’s packaged.

That said, the amount of nonsense that Templeton is tossing out there to convince people that they’re making their own hooch really leaves a bad taste in my mouth far beyond the ordinary bad taste of the rye.

HT: Kris Kanthak.

theshirtlesslifter:

walkingdeadites:

steveholtvstheuniverse:

every achievement in cinema history has led up to this moment

                 

I too believe in Space Jam

(Source: lindsaybluth, via hartznets)

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

(via hartznets)

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